Joy from Africa to the World

Joy from Africa to the World is a celebration of light and hope through locally made and sustainably produced installations that speak to the power of community, co-creation and sustainability, and are filled with stories of meaning, purpose and pride. By collaborating with local designers, makers and the everyday people of Cape Town who joined in our public workshops, we have created decorations imbued with the skills of weaving, beading, welding, drawing, repurposing and so much more.

This is an authentic celebration of African creativity, fuelled by local communities and underpinned by the V&A Waterfront’s commitment to people and our planet.

The Summer Palace

Welcome to our Summer Palace, also known as Ibhotwe Lasehlotyeni. It is the home of Queen Halima (Mother Earth) and King Luyolo (the Guardian of Joy). They are accompanied by an eclectic menagerie of beaded creatures, each with its own way of spreading light and hope from this part of Africa to the rest of the world. The naughty monkeys do this by jumping all over the show. Look at them hopping over the Tunnel of Light – a magical archway filled with lanterns decorated by the people of Cape Town, including children from Lalela and family and friends of our own V&A Waterfront staff.

Each beaded creature has been lovingly named by its artist, and has been infused with a sense of joy and optimism. You can see it in their bright colours and quirky patterns. These creatures know how to live together in harmony. They share and care and collaborate. Their sense of community keeps them nurtured and instils them with a sense of pride, and they are never afraid of reaching out to lend a helping hand. That’s why life in the Summer Palace is always filled with light and hope.

 

Make a wish as you wander through this celebratory walkway and watch as all your hopes and dreams come true.

Creative Direction: Platform Creative Agency

Design: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

Construction and Installation: Marketing Merchants

Diorama Concepts and Illustrations: Pauline Irvine of Artymiss

Pattern Designs: Glorinah Khutso Mabaso and Bonolo Helen Chepape

Illustrations: Phathu Nembilwi

Layout: Deep Agency

Beaded Creatures: Monkeybiz 

Lanterns: Lalela, Deep Agency and friends and family of the V&A Waterfront staff

Palace and Mannequin Surface Design: Sindiso Khumalo

Beaded Thrones: Africa Nova, Cape Town

Standing Birds: Papier-mâché, Temba Masala; Painting, Nombulelo Masala, Raaswater, Upington

Felt Trees: Ronel Jordaan, Cape Town

 

Beading with Purpose

 

These beaded creatures have been crafted with much love and creativity by more than 50 artists who form part of Monkeybiz, an economic upliftment project dedicated to reviving the traditional craft of African beadwork and empowering women to become financially independent.

 

The women, who live in townships around Cape Town, are supplied with beads and materials so that they can work on their artworks from home, earning an income from their finished products.

 

“Monkeybiz has shown people in our communities that beadwork can take them places and help them put food on the table,” says Mathapelo Ngaka, Community Director at Monkeybiz. Mathapelo acts as the link between the not-for-profit business and the bead artists, who live in townships around Cape Town.

 

Through her work as a beader and business leader, she has visited various cities in the US, and attended fairs in Germany, Norway and England. “I never thought that without a university education I would be able to travel the world and empower other women like I am doing,” she says.

Monkeybiz

General Manager: Barbara Tosalli-Dunlop

Community Director: Mathapelo Ngaka 

Animal framework: Victor Chiteura

 

Inkosana Yame-Afrika - The Bright-Nosed Buck

Khongoziwe Kuzani 

Phumla Mramba

Ziyanda Mramba (Phumla’s daughter)

Nande Nodolongo (Khongoziwe’s daughter)

 

Qondabantu - The Palace Dog

Lucy Lumkwana (emerging artist) 

Zisiwe Lumkwana (collectable artist and mother to Lucy)

 

Manqoba - The Observant Owl

Sheila Maishe

 

Eyethu - The Rowdy Rooster

Nomvuyo Mgudlwa

Sindiswa Sitwayi

 

Ngilosi - The Palace Cat

Nomthandazo Nyhontso

Mahlumelo Nkawule (Nomthandazo’s husband)

 

Lithemba - The Rare Rhino 

Mcedisi Mpoki

 

Siphosethu - The Happy Mummy Elephant

Nokwaliwa Makhonco

Nokonwaba Marebethwana

 

Adinamalusi - The Beautiful Baby Elephant

Joyce Sithole (collectable artist)

 

Isobi - The Stern Stork

Icelo - The Working Woodpecker

Octavia Nonjola (collectable artist)

 

Monkeys

Jabu - Evelyn Goqoza 

Bophelo - Mantshepiseng Maphaka

Ntsikelelo - Mandisa Mvinjana 

Uboya - Nadipha Mvinjana

 

Likhonaithemba - The On-the-go Gecko

Noloyiso Maphakathi

 

Mohluko - The Greeting Gecko

Nosipho Rum

Nomthunzi Zelanga

 

Snail Family - Protective Dad, Attentive Mum, Vulnerable Baby

Bongeka Dyakalashe

Christina Ngxana

Sindiswa Sitwayi

Bongeka Soko (collectable artist)

Busy Bees 

Noluvo Duna

Nokuphiwa Jongqo

Noxolo Maratsha

Nontle Matshaya

Nomakabongwe Mbombo

Nonzaliseko Mshiywa

Unathi Mvinjana 

Nomaover Phetshana

Nomakhaya Qoqa

Eunice Tema

Thabisa Vellem 

Nomzamo Xhontelo

 

Inquisitive Cape Shrews

Thandazwa Diko

Bongiwe Gobodo 

Vuyokazi Khohliso

Phumla Mramba 

Nonzaliseko Mshiyhwa

 

Boastful Butterflies

Thobeka Bessie

Bongeka Dyakalashe

Sandisiwe Magoda

Abongile Mondi

Nomboniso Mvinjelwa

Nosipho Ndaba

Nosintu Nkawule

Noziqhamo Nkawule

 

Giraffe

Octavia Nonjalo

 

Bush babies

Babalwa Mgutzi

Evelyn Goqoza

Mandisa Mvinjana

Vuyokazi Khohliso

 

V&A Beaded Logo 

Thandi Mankosi

 

Additional bead artist

Sandisile Nqadala

This magical Tree of Light is a diorama that expresses the beauty of life in so many forms – from music, story-telling and playground fun, to acts of kindness and sharing moments with family, friends and furry creatures.

 

Watch as Queen Halima (Mother Earth) and King Luyolo (the Guardian of Joy) wander along, lanterns in hand, to join their community in this festive-season celebration of light and hope. And then enjoy the abundance of goodwill that emerges as the tree fills up with more and more lanterns, spreading joy from Africa to the world.

 

The Tree of Light diorama was conceptualised by Pauline Irvine, founder of Artymiss, a company that usually creates bespoke laser-cut stationery and extraordinary paper artwork. Pauline’s illustration of the tree – from its branches filled with animals, to its tapering roots – has been turned into a fantastical moving work of art for you to enjoy from all sides.

The people of the Tree of Light were created by self-taught illustrator Nosipho Nxele, known for her ability to capture emotion in her designs, with the help of Pauline.

The skipping girl, gran with walking stick and tree-climbing boy are all part of the community celebrating light and hope with us this festive season. They are all overseen by Queen Halima (Mother Earth) and King Luyolo (the Guardian of Joy), designed by Phathu Nembilwi

 

Within these illustrations, you will see patterns designed by Glorinah Khutso Mabaso of Renaissance Design, who interprets African beauty through colours and shapes.

Creative Direction: Platform Creative Agency

Design: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

Construction and Installation: Centre Design

Diorama Concepts and Illustrations: Pauline Irvine of Artymiss

People Illustrations: Nosipho Nxele, Phathu Nembilwi and Pauline Irvine

Pattern Designs: Glorinah Khutso Mabaso

Layout: Deep Agency

Tree of Light 

 

Tonga Cascade

The Tonga basket is a truly sustainable product, made from ilala palm and dyed with tree bark by the Tonga people of Zimbabwe and Southern Zambia. The basket is first woven into a square and then radiates outwards to create diverse patterns, traditionally in the shape of a spider’s web or lightning. It is then finished in a signature herringbone pattern. 

 

This Tonga Cascade is accompanied by Thabisa Mjo’s Deconstructed Pendant Lights, made from beads and draw cord stretched over a complicated cascading framework. They are extra-large so that they can spread as much light and hope as possible from Africa to the world this festive season.

The Deconstructed Pendant Lights are by Thabisa Mjo of Mash. T Design Studio, and are extra-large so that they can spread as much light and hope as possible from Africa to the world this festive season. Thabisa was the winner of Design Indaba 2018’s Most Beautiful Object in South Africa and joint winner of 100% Design South Africa Designer of the Year 2019. Renowned for a contemporary take on her South African heritage, her theatrical statement lights are made from beads and draw cord stretched over a complicated cascading framework. 

Creative Direction: Platform Creative Agency

Design: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

Installation: Centre Design

Baskets: Amatuli, Johannesburg and Design Afrika, Cape Town

Beaded Lights: Thabisa Mjo, Mash.T Design Studio, Johannesburg

 
 

DuNoon Cascade

These baskets were made by the DuNoon Urban Weavers of Cape Town, a project to encourage traditional Xhosa weaving in an urban area. Binky Newman of Design Afrika helped found the group with funding from the City of Cape Town, and now partners with the group’s 12 members to produce exclusive designs.

 

Design Afrika negotiated a special permit for the group to harvest imisi reeds in the Table Bay Nature Reserve, from which the baskets are made. The cone design you see here is a collaboration between French designer Jean-Paul Merlin and the DuNoon weavers.

We’ve filled this cascade of baskets by the DuNoon Urban Weavers with light to symbolise our hope for a joyous future. The exposed light bulbs are from Hoi P’loy, a vintage lighting company based in our city’s design district of Woodstock, and run by wife and husband Ploy Phiromnam and Guy van der Walt.

 

“Light plays an undeniably important role in the atmosphere of our lives,” says the couple. “It is the love for a warm nostalgic glow from the past which inspires our products that reflect forgotten traditional values in today’s modern world.”

DuNoon Urban Weavers:

Nosisa Bopheka

Nomapopa Ralasi

Lindiwe Mthongana

 

Nomabali Group Weavers:

Nomonde Madlalisa (founder)

Mamzangwa Phathekile

Nolungile Stewu

Nonothisi Stewu

Togana Mvimbo

Creative Direction: Platform Creative Agency

Design: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

Installation: Centre Design

Baskets: Design, Jean-Paul Merlin of AS’ART, Paris, in collaboration with Binky Newman of Design Afrika and DuNoon Urban Weavers, Cape Town

Lights: Hoi P’loy, Cape Town

Gold Baobab Trees 2 (Fashion Link).jpg

Wola Nani Cascade

These baubles show how old elements can be repurposed to produce sustainable decorations. The scratched plastic balls from previous festive seasons were covered in papier-mâché by Wola Nani, using recycled paper from the V&A Waterfront’s Waste Recovery and Recycling Centre.

 

“When I started working as a crafter at Wola Nani, I had nothing after losing my husband, and I had to take care of two boys,” says team leader Zanele Zondi. “My income helped me put my children through school and, as a result, I am proud to say my eldest is a college graduate.”

Creative Direction: Platform Creative Agency

Design: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

Installation: Centre Design

Binga Baskets: Jambo, Cape Town

Tree Designs: Phathu Nembilwi and Deep Agency

Pattern Designs: Glorinah Khutso Mabaso

Papier-mâché Baubles: Wola Nani, Cape Town

Papier-mâché Artisans

Audrey Abrahams (operations)

Zanele Zondi (team leader)

Brandon Zondi

Brian Zondi

Cebo Mdanda

Lorraine Williams

Mzukisi Mxhesho

Nolundi Dayimani

Vuyiswa Mathe

 

Nomabali, DuNoon and Nongo Cascade

The gourds you see here were inspired by traditional clay pots that have been used for centuries in Africa to store liquid. They were woven by the DuNoon Urban Weavers of Cape Town, and the Nomabali Group in Coffee Bay. Both groups worked with Binky Newman of Design Afrika to create these forms.

 

The Nongo baskets also mimic the traditional clay pot (‘nongo’ meaning clay pot in Chitonga), and were woven with ilala palm by women of the BaTonga tribe in Zimbabwe. This basket was designed by Binky during a workshop run by The New Basket Workshop in partnership with the Binga Craft Centre, and has been so successful that many more weavers in the area have learned to make these shapes, ensuring that this particular weaving skill is passed on.

DuNoon Urban Weavers:

Nosisa Bopheka

Nomapopa Ralasi

Lindiwe Mthongana

 

Nomabali Group Weavers:

Nomonde Madlalisa (founder)

Mamzangwa Phathekile

Nolungile Stewu

Nonothisi Stewu

Togana Mvimbo

Nomabali, DuNoon & Nongo Cacade 1.jpg
 

Trees of Hope

 

Our Trees of Hope have been coloured in by 16 courageous girls who are part of the Mbokodo Club, a programme run by The Justice Desk. These trees represent 16 Days of Activism, a global campaign that runs annually from 25 November to 10 December, and is an initiative calling for the prevention and elimination of gender-based violence. 

Our 16 artists have all experienced hardships in life but still have such great hope for the future. Our wish is that their light and hope can fill you with optimism, too, as you read about their personal aspirations and dreams.

The V&A Waterfront is a proud funder of the Mbokodo Club, which offers female empowerment workshops, mental health support and self-defence programmes to girl survivors of gender-based violence and rape. The girls vary in age from 10 to 19, and come from the under-served community of Nyanga. Through an ongoing transformative process, they are equipped to become leaders and champions for human rights in their communities. 

The Justice Desk is a non-profit human rights organisation that promotes the power of everyday activism by empowering people to understand and defend their human rights so that they can transform society and create a more just and equal world.

Evile (15) hopes that South Africa commits to building more shelters for women and children who are victims of gender-based violence. She hopes that men respect them as young women. She used cheerful colours on her tree as she sees South Africa as a bright country full of bright children.

 

Busisiwe (14) hopes to see change in the way women are treated. She knows that South Africa is often overshadowed by negativity. However, she chose her colours because she sees our country as a beautiful place and wants 2021 to be bright and beautiful.

 

Mihlali (19) hopes for a more peaceful South Africa where fewer women are abused, and there is less judgement. She wants less tears of sorrow and more tears of joy. She used a lot of colours in her tree because, to her, South Africa is a colourful place.

 

Kelitha (17) wants to see change. She wants gender equality so that women are not discriminated against, and everyone is treated equally. She dreams of a country where we all learn to love and respect each other.

 

Inam’s (13) hope for 2021 is that violence stops and we love each other more. She wants to change the world and stop all abuse.

 

Ahluma’s (13) hope for 2021 is to be a leader and to be a hero. She’s inspired by boys and girls being equal to each other and helping one another.

Noludwe’s (15) inspiration is our rainbow nation. She wants to see us love and help each other, and says that our differences are a good thing.

 

Inganathi’s (13) hope for 2021 is that more people support kids who are less fortunate. She wants to see more men helping to stop gender-based violence. Inganathi wants us to change the whole entire world, and believes that we can!

 

Lilitha’s (17) hope is that women are treated equally in the future. She says that people look down on women and don’t think they can do more than men, but she believes that women can be whatever they want to be! She hopes to be educated and become a doctor one day, and then to become the first female president.

Anelisa’s (13) hope is for gender equality, love and peace. And she would love us all to respect one another.

 

Lindokuhle (15) is inspired by women. We must be strong, confident and empowered as women, she says. Her hope for 2021 is that gender-based violence is stopped and that women are respected.

 

Yolisa’s (16) hope for 2021 is that crime and gender-based violence are stopped. She was inspired by the colour pink because it is the colour of the Mbokodo Club.

 

Asakhanya (15) knows that there is too much corruption and she would like to change that. She hopes that better leaders are chosen for South Africa, inspired by South African women who are brave enough to lead.

 

Lelethu’s (15) hope for 2021 is that crime and gender-based violence in South Africa are stopped. People should not be judged for how they look, she says, and there must be equality and respect.

 

Ikhona (14) sees women as being strong, beautiful and powerful, and wants their bodies to be respected. She hopes for gender equality and an end to corruption.

 

Andiswe (13) believes in a country where respect, care and love are for everyone. She wants gender-based violence to stop, because enough is enough. She says that the Mbokodo Club has shown her that women have a voice, and she now sees herself as strong, fierce and fearless.

Creative Direction: Platform Creative Agency

Design: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

Tree Artwork: The Justice Desk’s Mbokodo Girls (names on trees)

Design and Layout: Deep Agency

 
Watershed Chandelier Kelp Forest 1 (1).j

A Sustainable Kelp Forest

We care about the planet and its inhabitants. That’s why our festive decorations are made with sustainable materials by the people of Cape Town. The Our Workshop team in Langa, together with Captain Fanplastic, hosted workshops for the public to get involved in the making of these hanging kelp garlands. They are made from old plastic bottles, sourced around the city.

Other elements have been fashioned by talented Watershed tenants, like the dangling seaweed, made by Davis Ndungu of Recycled Flip Flop Sculptures. Swimming through this underwater forest you’ll spot wooden fish by Kenau Botha of BlocART, who uses recycled wood, as well as colourful jellyfish, starfish and angel fish. These were all skilfully formed from wire and beadwork by Bishop and Anderson Tarambawamwe of Master Wire and Bead Craft.

Creative Direction: Platform Creative Agency

Design: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

Installation: Centre Design

Kelp Garlands: Our Workshop, Langa

Seaweed Garlands: Davis Ndungu of Recycled Flip Flop Sculptures, Watershed

Fish: Kenau Botha of BlocART, Watershed

Jellyfish, Starfish and Angel Fish: Bishop and Anderson Tarambawamwe of Master Wire and Bead Craft, Watershed

 

A Sustainable Woodland Forest

We care about the planet and its inhabitants. That’s why our festive decorations are made with sustainable materials by the people of Cape Town. The Our Workshop team in Langa, together with Captain Fanplastic, hosted workshops for the public to get involved in the making of these leafy garlands. They are made from old plastic bottles, sourced around the city.

 

Other elements have been fashioned by talented Watershed tenants, like the metal butterflies fluttering through the forest. They were made by Samson Sithole of Sunshine Crafts, while the birds and weavers’ nests were skilfully formed from wire and beadwork by Bishop and Anderson Tarambawamwe of Master Wire and Bead Craft. The weaver light shades are made from papier-mâché by Quazi Design.

The Southern Cross is the ultimate guiding light in South Africa, and is seen only in the Southern Hemisphere. There is no better place to celebrate this celestial marvel than in one of our largest open spaces at the V&A Waterfront.

The podium on which these stars stand is covered in designs by Bonolo Helen Chepape of Lulasclan, who takes an unexpected approach to African print, making it cool, current and colourful. By researching traditional shapes and using them respectfully in updated ways, she imbues her work with story-telling mechanisms that honour the past while looking toward the future.

“I wanted to create an illustration that tells the story of giving and sharing light, which is ultimately hope. When you think of light, it does not just illuminate a singular section or space – it lights up an entire surface,” says Bonolo. “I wanted to communicate that if we all strive to be agents of hope, we can create positive change, not only for those around us, but for our entire communities. The illustrations depict the catching and kindling of light, either from lamps or small candles, and dancers reaching towards the stars to harvest the light. My wish is that we nurture our light to create a hopeful spirit for those around us.”

 


 

Creative Direction: Platform Creative Agency
Design: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara
Illustration: Bonolo Helen Chepape
Installation: Centre Design

Silo Constellation

 

Behind the Scenes

 

Platform Creative Agency directed the creation and curation of our sustainable, locally made festive decorations. “We are strongly committed to a prosperous Africa and the improvement for all through good business practice and engaging design,” say founders Cathy O’Clery and Laurence Brick. “We honour our fragile planet by creating quality projects and products that are sustainable, meaningful and relevant in today’s world.” 

 

Platform has worked with leading local and international brands such as 100% Design South Africa, South African Mint, Zeitz MOCAA, Groot Constantia and Spier. Its work includes museum curation, interior design, retail strategy and design, product development and design, and global photographic and marketing campaigns.

CREATIVE DIRECTION: 

Platform Creative Agency


DESIGN: 

Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara


INSTALLATION: 

Centre Design


BASKETS: 

Amatuli, Johannesburg and Design Afrika, Cape Town


BEADED LIGHTS: 

Thabisa Mjo, Mash.T Design Studio, Johannesburg

Platform Creative

Creative director, and leading authority on African design, Cathy O’Clery of Platform Creative Agency was tasked with curating the designs for these festive installations, and seeking out creative local companies who work according to the principles of sustainability.

“It’s a real joy to see the possibilities of what can be achieved for the planet when companies like the V&A Waterfront embrace an ethos that focuses on the importance of protecting our earth and celebrates and employs the local creative communities who are working toward this goal, too,” she says.

CREATIVE DIRECTION: 

Platform Creative Agency

DESIGN: 

Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

INSTALLATION: 

Centre Design

BASKETS: 

Amatuli, Johannesburg and Design Afrika, Cape Town

BEADED LIGHTS: 
Thabisa Mjo, Mash.T Design Studio, Johannesburg

Cathy O'Clery

Centre Design, under the direction of Brendan Wessels, has been overseeing our festive-season decorations for many years. As leaders in shopping-centre installations, they welcomed our sustainable, locally focused approach, finding novel ways to make our vision come to life. “It is thrilling to acknowledge local craft and showcase it to the world,” says Brendan.

 

Centre Design CEO Tshitso Letjeba says, “We have seen the V&A’s concepts grow from traditional decorations, to a combination of traditional and illuminated concepts that follow international trends. This design, with an African twist, is much more appropriate to Southern Africa.” 

CREATIVE DIRECTION: 

Platform Creative Agency

DESIGN:

Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

INSTALLATION:

Centre Design

 

BUHERA BASKETS: 

Amatuli, Johannesburg and Design Afrika, Cape Town

WOLOF BASKETS: 

Jambo, Cape Town

Centre Design

Our Workshop was founded by socially conscious designer-maker Heath Nash, who works mostly with recycled or reusable material to create sustainable products that make a difference in the lives of the people with whom he works.

Says Heath, “I see social design as a very important field of design. We’re living in desperate circumstances of mass migration and environmental collapse. Specifically in Cape Town – one of the most incredibly unequal and unfair cities in the world – I believe socially motivated design and art-making can play a big part to open up opportunities for change and growth.”

CREATIVE DIRECTION:   Platform Creative Agency

DESIGN:  Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

INSTALLATION:  Centre Design

LEAF GARLANDS: Our Workshop, Langa

BIRDS & NESTS: Bishop and Anderson Tarambawamwe of Master Wire and Bead Craft, Watershed

BUTTERFLIES: Samson Sithole of Sunshine Crafts, Watershed

LIGHT SHADES: Quazi Design, Watershed

LIGHTS: Hoi P’loy, Cape Town

Our Workshop

Deep Agency has been instrumental in making this exhibition signage and all other communication elements truly represent our festive theme of celebrating light and hope. Through joyous illustrations and graphic elements of design, the agency has helped us convey a message of positivity and optimism through beautiful visual cues.

 

"We are so grateful to have played a role in the brand-building and design roll-out of this inspiring project,” say designers Wendy Dixon and Emma Lock. “Joy from Africa to the World truly is a celebration of the spirit of the people of South Africa. Even in difficult times, there is always a light."

CREATIVE DIRECTION: 

Platform Creative Agency

DESIGN: 

Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

TREE ARTWORK: 

The Justice Desk’s Mbokodo Girls

DESIGN & LAYOUT: 

Deep Agency

Deep Agency

The Tree of Light diorama was conceptualised by Pauline Irvine, founder of Artymiss, a company that usually creates bespoke laser-cut stationery and extraordinary paper artwork. Pauline’s illustration of the tree – from its branches filled with animals, to its tapering roots – has been turned into a fantastical moving work of art for you to enjoy from all sides.

CREATIVE DIRECTION: 

Platform Creative Agency

DESIGN: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

INSTALLATIONS: Marketing Merchants

MANNEQUIN SURFACE DESIGN: Sindiso Khumalo

SET PAINTERS: Mary Collins and Sharon Maytham

FLYING BIRDS: Claude Mutanho, Johannesburg

BRANCH LIGHTS: Brendan Wessels, Centre Design

Pauline Irvine

James MacNamara, one of South Africa’s leading set and spatial designers, worked with Creative Director Cathy O’Clery on the design of our complex installations. James has worked across genres, designing sets, costumes and lighting for opera, theatre and television productions, both locally and abroad.

 

He was the principal designer for the FIFA World Cup 2010 and AFCON 2013 opening and closing ceremonies, and his understanding of space and human interaction around installations has been integral in turning our festive decorations into a celebration of light and hope. “It is important to consider sustainability with every action that we take, especially when working on installations of this scale,” he says.

CREATIVE DIRECTION: 

Platform Creative Agency

DESIGN: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

INSTALLATION: Centre Design

BUHERA BASKETS: Amatuli, Johannesburg and Design Afrika, Cape Town

WOLOF BASKETS: Jambo, Cape Town

James MacNamara

Marketing Merchants was vital in creating our Summer Palace and making our three-dimensional vision come to life. The company is a leader in designing and building exhibition stands around the world, and has done work for brands such as Johnson & Johnson, Protea Hotels and Parmalat.

 

“It was exciting to be involved in something so creative, in the high-profile environment of the Waterfront,” says Darryl Mink, whose crew did everything from the flooring, lighting and arch installations to hanging the lanterns, securing the Monkeybiz creatures and creating painted special effects.

CREATIVE DIRECTION: Platform Creative Agency

DESIGN: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

CONSTRUCTION & INSTALLATION: Marketing Merchants

DIORAMA CONCEPTS & ILLUSTRATIONS: Pauline Irvine of Artymiss

PATTERN DESIGNS: Glorinah Khutso Mabaso and Bonolo Helen Chepape

ILLUSTRATIONS: Phathu Nembilwi

LAYOUT: Deep Agency

BEADED CREATURES: Monkeybiz

LANTERNS: Lalela, Deep Agency and friends and family of the V&A Waterfront staff

PALACE & MANNEQUIN SURFACE DESIGN: Sindiso Khumalo

BEADED THRONES: Africa Nova, Cape Town

Standing Birds: Papier-mâché, Temba Masala; Painting, Nombulelo Masala, Raaswater, Upington

FELT TREES: Ronel Jordaan, Cape Town

Marketing Merchants

Bonolo Helen Chepape of Lulasclan, developed a narrative around our joyous theme. “It tells the story of giving and sharing light, which is ultimately hope. When you think of light, it does not just illuminate a singular section or space – it lights up an entire surface,” she says. “I wanted to communicate that if we all strive to be agents of hope, we can create positive change, not only for those around us, but for our entire communities. Her illustrations depict the catching and kindling of light, either from lamps or small candles, and dancers reaching towards the stars to harvest the light. My wish is that we nurture our light to create a hopeful spirit for those around us.”

CREATIVE DIRECTION: Platform Creative Agency

DESIGN: Cathy O’Clery and James MacNamara

INSTALLATION: Marketing Merchants

Mannequin Surface Design: Sindiso Khumalo

SET PAINTERS: Mary Collins and Sharon Maytham

FLYING BIRDS: Claude Mutanho, Johannesburg

BRANCH LIGHTS: Brendan Wessels, Centre Design

Bonolo Chepape